The Oscar Pistorius murder trial Day 41 Times LIVE, Tymon Smith, Sapa and AFP | 08 August, 2014

Oscar Pistorius will learn his fate next month after Judge Thokozile Masipa confirmed she would start delivering her verdict on September 11.

On Friday Pistorius’s lawyer Barry Roux did his best to drill holes into prosecutor Gerrie Nel’s “baker’s dozen of incongruencies”, which he presented during the state’s closing arguments on Thursday.

Roux, arguing that each of Nel’s incongruencies could easily be explained, told the court: “If that’s a baker’s dozen, then I don’t want to eat those cookies.”

Roux also told the court that the “days of the reasonable man of the 1960s, in the grey suit wearing grey shoes, are over. We have moved on.”

Roux argued that Pistorius’s anxiety and feelings of vulnerability arising out of his disability needed to be considered when reaching a verdict in the Paralympian’s murder trial.

Roux argued that the state failed to provide conclusive evidence of an argument between Pistorius and his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp in the early hours of Valentine’s Day last year and that there was no motive or evidence of intent that would justify a conviction of murder. On the point of dolus eventualis or legal intent, Roux pointed that Steenkamp was in the bedroom and that an intruder was behind the cubicle door. Therefore, Roux said, Pistorius could not have foreseen that his actions would lead to her death.

The defence rested its case arguing that Pistorius had fired due to a reflexive reaction to noises in the toilet and that Steenkamp’s death had been an accident – “a huge, unfortunate mistake.”

“It all comes down to those 30 seconds when the accused was standing in front of the toilet door with his firearm,” Roux told Masipa and her assessors.

In his reply, Nel reminded the court that the identity of who was behind the toilet door was irrelevant – “a human being was behind that door”.

Nel added that Pistorius had intended to kill that person – an action, he said, that had consequences.

Oscar ‘guilty of murder’: Nel – Sapa

Paralympic double amputee athlete Oscar Pistorius is guilty of the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, the State said in the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

“My lady, he knew it was a human being in the toilet. His intention was to kill a human being,” prosecutor Gerrie Nel said in answering the defence’s final arguments.

“[if Pistorius] shot into cubicle well-knowing there is a human being in there then he is guilty of murder. My lady, if someone shoots to kill then there must be consequences.”

Because Pistorius had said he wanted to shoot an intruder at his Pretoria home on February 14 last year, and not his girlfriend, did not change the fact that it was murder, said Nel.

Pistorius is on trial for the murder of Steenkamp.

He shot and killed her through a locked toilet door at his home. He alleged he mistook her for an intruder. The State contends that he shot her after an argument.

Nel said the defences provided by his defence was “so mutually exclusive that they are mutually destructive”.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges as well.

The case was postponed to September 11.

Oscar case comes down to ‘split second’ – Sapa

The murder trial of Paralympic athlete Oscar Pistoisus all comes down to the split second before he pulled the trigger and shot his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, the High Court in Pretoria heard on Friday.

“It comes down to that split second,” Barry Roux, SC for Pistorius said.

Roux said Pistorius should be charged with culpable homicide and not murder.

He said he did not think it was wrong for Pistorius to arm himself or to try and avoid the perceived danger from coming out of the cubicle.

Roux said the court should decide what a reasonable person would do in that split second.

“You have to find one of two things, and you have to assume the noise… When he heard the noise was he negligent? Was he acting reasonable? Or would the reasonable person have acted differently?

“Let’s now look at the reasonable person, with the same abilities slash disabilities,” Roux said.

He said that if the court found that for a person without legs, facing the door and hearing the sound, the actions were that of a reasonable person, the charges should be dropped.

“If this was reasonable, you must acquit him,” Roux said.

“If you find that that action was not reasonable, then it’s your finding, my lady.”

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act “one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges as well.

Prosecutor Gerrie Nel responded to Roux’s arguments when he concluded.

Oscar lawyer dismisses state’s ‘baker’s dozen’ – Sapa

Murder-accused Oscar Pistorius’s lawyer dealt with the State’s “proverbial baker’s dozen” used to show that he lied, in the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

“My lady, if that’s a baker’s dozen then I don’t want to eat those cookies,” Barry Roux SC, said to soft giggles from the public gallery.

On Thursday, prosecutor Gerrie Nel listed 13 “instances” that showed Pistorius had “incongruities and deceit” and was tailoring his version and called it the proverbial “baker’s dozen”.

These included Pistorius not remembering where certain items were in the bathroom and telling the court he did not remember certain aspects, only to later concede that he forgot or that his memory was not good.

Pistorius is charged with murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has also pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Roux said Pistorius’s actions after Steenkamp was shot were not consistent with a man who was trying to kill his girlfriend.

“Why would he want her to be saved so she can turn around and say this man should be locked up — look what he did to me,” Roux said.

“It’s absolutely inconsistent with a man trying to kill his girlfriend.”

During the trial the court heard that Pistorius carried Steenkamp down the stairs after he broke down the toilet door. He called neighbours, a hospital and paramedics to help.

The court heard that he wanted to take her to hospital and begged God to save Steenkamp.

Roux scrutinises neighbours’ evidence – Sapa

Murder-accused Oscar Pistorius’s lawyer on Friday continued to focus on evidence given by State witnesses during the trial.

In his closing arguments, Barry Roux SC, told the court there was a “list of coincidences” in the statements and testimonies of Charl Johnson and his wife, Michelle Burger.

The couple lived in the complex next to Pistorius’s home.

They testified to hearing blood-curdling screams on the morning that Pistorius shot dead his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.

“Mr Johnson said: ‘When my wife testified, she spoke about the jakkals at night’,” Roux told the court.

This was despite them saying they had not discussed the proceedings of the trial.

“He used her words when he was not supposed to,” said Roux.

He described the statements the couple gave to police as being “virtually identical”.

Roux also referred to the evidence of Anette Stipp and her husband, Dr Johan Stipp.

Anette Stipp had said that after the second sounds were heard her husband told her to get away from the window, said Roux.

The couple lived in the house adjacent to Pistorius’s.

She claimed that shortly after this screaming came from Pistorius’s house.

“This was highly unlikely,” said Roux.

He dismissed claims by Anette Stipp that sounds of arguing seemed to come from Pistorius’s home.

“If you read that evidence it can never justify any inference that the accused and the deceased were arguing,” said Roux.

He submitted that Pistorius was in love with Steenkamp, although they had their differences like any other couple.

Roux also referred to the testimony of Yvette van Schalkwyk, a government social worker, who claimed to have first met Pistorius shortly after he shot Steenkamp.

She had told the court she was disturbed by allegations that Pistorius was acting as he cried and appeared emotional during the trial.

“She said… ‘This man was genuine in his conduct. He was concerned about the deceased’s family. He was heartbroken… He was a man in mourning,” Roux told the court.

Pistorius is charged with murdering Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has also pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Roux examines neighbour’s evidence – Sapa

A state witness in murder-accused Oscar Pistorius’s trial was “desperate” to help the State, Pistorius’s lawyer told the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

In his closing arguments, Barry Roux SC, focused on the statements and testimonies of several State witnesses who were neighbours of Pistorius.

Roux referred to the evidence of Dr Johan Stipp and said he was “desperate to help the State”.

In his statement to police, Stipp had simply said he had heard the screams of a woman coming from a neighbour’s house.

However, in the witness box he had added that the screams were fearful and emotional.

Roux queried why this was left out of his initial statement.

“His evidence was inconsistent with the other witnesses,” said Roux. The court could not rely on his evidence.

Roux said Stipp’s recollection of the sequence of events differed from that provided by other people who were on the scene.

Pistorius is charged with murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has also pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Prosecutor ‘desperate and naughty’: Pistorius’s lawyer – Sapa

The prosecutor in murder-accused Oscar Pistorius’s trial is “desperate and naughty”, Barry Roux SC, for Pistorius, told the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

“Mr Nel is desperate. I have a lot of respect for Mr Nel and his experience,” Roux said, referring to prosecutor Gerrie Nel.

Roux said Nel had submitted evidence in his closing arguments based on an interview on a Pretoria radio station.

He said Nel knew it was wrong and was being naughty because the prosecution lacked evidence.

“You cannot quote a radio and say this is evidence… The hole is too big. He had to refer to a radio station,” Roux said.

“The State fetched cases from another jurisdiction… It was to create this atmosphere, knowing its deficiencies,” he said.

Pistorius is charged with murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has also pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Athletes trained to react to sound: Roux – Sapa

As a track athlete, murder-accused Oscar Pistorius is trained to react to sound, his lawyer told the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

Barry Roux SC, said that having armed himself, Pistorius heard a noise in his toilet and his immediate reaction was to pull the trigger.

“He was standing at the door, vulnerable, anxious with his finger on the trigger and when he heard a noise, bang”, said Roux, referring to shots Pistorius fired.

Pistorius is charged with murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges.

“We are not making the submission that the accused did not arm himself,” Roux told the court in his closing arguments on Friday.

“He armed himself. He went to the toilet. He foresaw that it might be necessary to fire the shots. He was anxious and fearful,” said Roux.

The court simply had to decide whether the action to shoot at the door was simply reflex or whether it was reflex combined with the cognitive.

If the shooting simply happened due to reflex action, then this would prove that Pistorius lacked capacity.

If it was reflex and cognitive combined, then the court should explore what the thought behind the action was, said Roux, adding that the thought in Pistorius’s mind that day was that he was in danger.

Submitting his closing arguments on Thursday, prosecutor Gerrie Nel said Pistorius had shot at the door knowing Steenkamp was behind it.

He called Pistorius an appalling witness who had tailored his evidence.

On Friday, Roux said the evidence of ballistic expert Captain Chris Mangena showed Pistorius was not directly in front of the toilet door when he shot at it, but rather at the bathroom door.

“This proves that he was actually scared and not trusting of the person who was in that toilet,” said Roux.

He was about two metres away from the door when he fired, fatally wounding Steenkamp.

Referring to the Whatsapp messages between Steenkamp and Pistorius, Roux dismissed Nel’s suggestion that the 10 percent “unhappy” messages between the two were the messages that carried the most weight.

Steenkamp had sent a message to Pistorius on January 27, 2013 where she said she was scared of him.

On February 7, 2013, she sent another message explaining that she was unhappy with him.

Roux argued that the subsequent messages were affectionate.

A security guard who testified in the trial told the court that when he called Pistorius shortly after the shooting at his residence, Pistorius told him that “everything was OK”.

On Thursday, Nel criticised Pistorius for this, saying a reasonable action would have been for Pistorius to ask security to call for help.

Roux defended Pistorius on Friday and said there were reasons for this.

Pistorius could have already received help from one of his neighbours who was a doctor, the paramedics had already been called, and he could not speak to the guard because he was crying.

Case shouldn’t have been murder: Roux – Sapa

Paralympic athlete Oscar Pistorius should have been charged with culpable homicide and not murder, his lawyer argued in the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

Barry Roux SC, said the State’s version that the athlete made up the fact that he mistook his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp for an intruder when he shot her dead was not true.

Roux said Pistorius told the first people who arrived on the scene that he thought she was an intruder.

“He repeated that and went into the bail application before seeing the docket,” Roux said.

“So on what basis are you saying that he is lying?”

Roux said Pistorius was negligent.

“That is culpable homicide… That is what the case should have been about…”

Pistorius is charged with murdering Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges.

On Friday, Roux said the failure by the State to “leave out” evidence left question marks and could mean that the scene was disturbed.

He said State witnesses admitted that they had tampered with evidence. He showed the court two pictures. In one a hand could be seen holding open the bedroom curtain.

“Why was it necessary to keep it open? Why not take a photograph without someone holding the curtain open to gain a real view?” Roux asked.

He also dealt with a moved multiplug and showed a photograph taken in the bedroom.

“The unfortunate consequence of that was that Mr Pistorius was cross-examined that there was no place for the multiplug,” Roux said.

He argued that they had received a photograph from the State on Wednesday that showed a hand either removing or plugging in a plug.

“Was he putting it in or taking it out? What concerns us is that that photo was in the possession of the State.

“The State must have known about this.”

Roux said there was no way the State could argue that the scene was not tampered with.

On Thursday, prosecutor Gerrie Nel completed his closing arguments and described Pistorius as a deceitful and dishonest person, who would rather hide behind untruths than admit he murdered his girlfriend in cold blood.

Nel said Pistorius was an appalling witness who had tailored his evidence to avoid prosecution. He dismissed several points of Pistorius’s testimony as improbable and untruthful.

The case continues.

Pistorius lawyer says ‘cold facts’ do not prove murder – AFP

Oscar Pistorius’s defence lawyer said Friday the ‘cold facts’ did not prove the star sprinter had intended to kill his model girlfriend, as he launched a final bid to save the “Blade Runner” from life in prison.

In his closing argument, fiery defence lawyer Barry Roux sought to pick apart the prosecution’s case that his famous client had deliberately murdered 29-year-old Reeva Steenkamp after an argument in the early hours of Valentine’s Day 2013.

Roux accused the state of ignoring evidence from Pistorius’s upmarket Pretoria home that did not support its “circumstantial” case, a day after the prosecution painted the athlete as a liar.

“The failure of the state to present that evidence leaves one big question mark,” said Roux, “that’s the failure of the state’s case.”

He argued that evidence suggested Pistorius should never have faced murder charges, but rather the trial should have begun with a lesser charge of culpable homicide.

On Thursday Pistorius, a Paralympian known as the “Blade Runner” for his prosthetic legs, was branded a “deceitful” witness by prosecutor Gerrie Nel in his final arguments.

Pistorius’s efforts to concoct an alibi had led to a “snowball effect” of lies requiring more lies to back them up, Nel said.

The athlete says he killed Steenkamp by firing four shots through a locked toilet door after mistaking her for an intruder in his upmarket Pretoria home on the night of Valentine’s Day last year.

The prosecution argues that he deliberately killed her after an argument.

“In an attempt to tailor his version to support his plea explanation, he tangled himself in a web,” said Nel.

Summing up the state’s meticulous 200-page review of evidence gleaned from almost 40 witnesses, Nel said Pistorius, 27, was guilty of “a baker’s dozen” of misleading statements.

Nel addressed the court for most of the day on Thursday before the defence had a brief opportunity to outline the counter-arguments it will present on Friday.

Roux has indicated that he will focus on the timeline of events the night of the shooting, from disputed sounds of gunshots and equally disputed sounds of screams heard by neighbours.

Pistorius, a double-amputee who rose to international fame when he competed alongside able-bodied runners at the 2012 London Olympics, has at times sat weeping and vomiting in the dock as grisly details of Steenkamp’s death were presented.

Once a poster boy for disabled sport, he has been stripped of lucrative endorsement deals by global brands and has withdrawn from all competition.

He faces 25 years in jail if he is convicted of premeditated murder. He also faces three separate gun-related charges.

Even if he is not found guilty of premeditated murder, Pistorius could still be convicted and jailed on alternative charges of culpable homicide.

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The Oscar Pistorius murder trial Day 41
Times LIVE, Tymon Smith, Sapa and AFP | 08 August, 2014

Photograph by: POOL
All the news from the Oscar Pistorius murder trial Day 41 in one place.
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Oscar Pistorius murder trial judgement to start September 11 -Tymon Smith

Oscar Pistorius will learn his fate next month after Judge Thokozile Masipa confirmed she would start delivering her verdict on September 11.

On Friday Pistorius’s lawyer Barry Roux did his best to drill holes into prosecutor Gerrie Nel’s “baker’s dozen of incongruencies”, which he presented during the state’s closing arguments on Thursday.

Roux, arguing that each of Nel’s incongruencies could easily be explained, told the court: “If that’s a baker’s dozen, then I don’t want to eat those cookies.”

Roux also told the court that the “days of the reasonable man of the 1960s, in the grey suit wearing grey shoes, are over. We have moved on.”

Roux argued that Pistorius’s anxiety and feelings of vulnerability arising out of his disability needed to be considered when reaching a verdict in the Paralympian’s murder trial.

Roux argued that the state failed to provide conclusive evidence of an argument between Pistorius and his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp in the early hours of Valentine’s Day last year and that there was no motive or evidence of intent that would justify a conviction of murder. On the point of dolus eventualis or legal intent, Roux pointed that Steenkamp was in the bedroom and that an intruder was behind the cubicle door. Therefore, Roux said, Pistorius could not have foreseen that his actions would lead to her death.

The defence rested its case arguing that Pistorius had fired due to a reflexive reaction to noises in the toilet and that Steenkamp’s death had been an accident – “a huge, unfortunate mistake.”

“It all comes down to those 30 seconds when the accused was standing in front of the toilet door with his firearm,” Roux told Masipa and her assessors.

In his reply, Nel reminded the court that the identity of who was behind the toilet door was irrelevant – “a human being was behind that door”.

Nel added that Pistorius had intended to kill that person – an action, he said, that had consequences.

Oscar ‘guilty of murder’: Nel – Sapa

Paralympic double amputee athlete Oscar Pistorius is guilty of the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, the State said in the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

“My lady, he knew it was a human being in the toilet. His intention was to kill a human being,” prosecutor Gerrie Nel said in answering the defence’s final arguments.

“[if Pistorius] shot into cubicle well-knowing there is a human being in there then he is guilty of murder. My lady, if someone shoots to kill then there must be consequences.”

Because Pistorius had said he wanted to shoot an intruder at his Pretoria home on February 14 last year, and not his girlfriend, did not change the fact that it was murder, said Nel.

Pistorius is on trial for the murder of Steenkamp.

He shot and killed her through a locked toilet door at his home. He alleged he mistook her for an intruder. The State contends that he shot her after an argument.

Nel said the defences provided by his defence was “so mutually exclusive that they are mutually destructive”.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges as well.

The case was postponed to September 11.

Oscar case comes down to ‘split second’ – Sapa

The murder trial of Paralympic athlete Oscar Pistoisus all comes down to the split second before he pulled the trigger and shot his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, the High Court in Pretoria heard on Friday.

“It comes down to that split second,” Barry Roux, SC for Pistorius said.

Roux said Pistorius should be charged with culpable homicide and not murder.

He said he did not think it was wrong for Pistorius to arm himself or to try and avoid the perceived danger from coming out of the cubicle.

Roux said the court should decide what a reasonable person would do in that split second.

“You have to find one of two things, and you have to assume the noise… When he heard the noise was he negligent? Was he acting reasonable? Or would the reasonable person have acted differently?

“Let’s now look at the reasonable person, with the same abilities slash disabilities,” Roux said.

He said that if the court found that for a person without legs, facing the door and hearing the sound, the actions were that of a reasonable person, the charges should be dropped.

“If this was reasonable, you must acquit him,” Roux said.

“If you find that that action was not reasonable, then it’s your finding, my lady.”

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act “one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges as well.

Prosecutor Gerrie Nel responded to Roux’s arguments when he concluded.

Oscar lawyer dismisses state’s ‘baker’s dozen’ – Sapa

Murder-accused Oscar Pistorius’s lawyer dealt with the State’s “proverbial baker’s dozen” used to show that he lied, in the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

“My lady, if that’s a baker’s dozen then I don’t want to eat those cookies,” Barry Roux SC, said to soft giggles from the public gallery.

On Thursday, prosecutor Gerrie Nel listed 13 “instances” that showed Pistorius had “incongruities and deceit” and was tailoring his version and called it the proverbial “baker’s dozen”.

These included Pistorius not remembering where certain items were in the bathroom and telling the court he did not remember certain aspects, only to later concede that he forgot or that his memory was not good.

Pistorius is charged with murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has also pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Roux said Pistorius’s actions after Steenkamp was shot were not consistent with a man who was trying to kill his girlfriend.

“Why would he want her to be saved so she can turn around and say this man should be locked up — look what he did to me,” Roux said.

“It’s absolutely inconsistent with a man trying to kill his girlfriend.”

During the trial the court heard that Pistorius carried Steenkamp down the stairs after he broke down the toilet door. He called neighbours, a hospital and paramedics to help.

The court heard that he wanted to take her to hospital and begged God to save Steenkamp.

Roux scrutinises neighbours’ evidence – Sapa

Murder-accused Oscar Pistorius’s lawyer on Friday continued to focus on evidence given by State witnesses during the trial.

In his closing arguments, Barry Roux SC, told the court there was a “list of coincidences” in the statements and testimonies of Charl Johnson and his wife, Michelle Burger.

The couple lived in the complex next to Pistorius’s home.

They testified to hearing blood-curdling screams on the morning that Pistorius shot dead his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.

“Mr Johnson said: ‘When my wife testified, she spoke about the jakkals at night’,” Roux told the court.

This was despite them saying they had not discussed the proceedings of the trial.

“He used her words when he was not supposed to,” said Roux.

He described the statements the couple gave to police as being “virtually identical”.

Roux also referred to the evidence of Anette Stipp and her husband, Dr Johan Stipp.

Anette Stipp had said that after the second sounds were heard her husband told her to get away from the window, said Roux.

The couple lived in the house adjacent to Pistorius’s.

She claimed that shortly after this screaming came from Pistorius’s house.

“This was highly unlikely,” said Roux.

He dismissed claims by Anette Stipp that sounds of arguing seemed to come from Pistorius’s home.

“If you read that evidence it can never justify any inference that the accused and the deceased were arguing,” said Roux.

He submitted that Pistorius was in love with Steenkamp, although they had their differences like any other couple.

Roux also referred to the testimony of Yvette van Schalkwyk, a government social worker, who claimed to have first met Pistorius shortly after he shot Steenkamp.

She had told the court she was disturbed by allegations that Pistorius was acting as he cried and appeared emotional during the trial.

“She said… ‘This man was genuine in his conduct. He was concerned about the deceased’s family. He was heartbroken… He was a man in mourning,” Roux told the court.

Pistorius is charged with murdering Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has also pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Roux examines neighbour’s evidence – Sapa

A state witness in murder-accused Oscar Pistorius’s trial was “desperate” to help the State, Pistorius’s lawyer told the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

In his closing arguments, Barry Roux SC, focused on the statements and testimonies of several State witnesses who were neighbours of Pistorius.

Roux referred to the evidence of Dr Johan Stipp and said he was “desperate to help the State”.

In his statement to police, Stipp had simply said he had heard the screams of a woman coming from a neighbour’s house.

However, in the witness box he had added that the screams were fearful and emotional.

Roux queried why this was left out of his initial statement.

“His evidence was inconsistent with the other witnesses,” said Roux. The court could not rely on his evidence.

Roux said Stipp’s recollection of the sequence of events differed from that provided by other people who were on the scene.

Pistorius is charged with murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has also pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Prosecutor ‘desperate and naughty’: Pistorius’s lawyer – Sapa

The prosecutor in murder-accused Oscar Pistorius’s trial is “desperate and naughty”, Barry Roux SC, for Pistorius, told the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

“Mr Nel is desperate. I have a lot of respect for Mr Nel and his experience,” Roux said, referring to prosecutor Gerrie Nel.

Roux said Nel had submitted evidence in his closing arguments based on an interview on a Pretoria radio station.

He said Nel knew it was wrong and was being naughty because the prosecution lacked evidence.

“You cannot quote a radio and say this is evidence… The hole is too big. He had to refer to a radio station,” Roux said.

“The State fetched cases from another jurisdiction… It was to create this atmosphere, knowing its deficiencies,” he said.

Pistorius is charged with murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has also pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Athletes trained to react to sound: Roux – Sapa

As a track athlete, murder-accused Oscar Pistorius is trained to react to sound, his lawyer told the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

Barry Roux SC, said that having armed himself, Pistorius heard a noise in his toilet and his immediate reaction was to pull the trigger.

“He was standing at the door, vulnerable, anxious with his finger on the trigger and when he heard a noise, bang”, said Roux, referring to shots Pistorius fired.

Pistorius is charged with murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges.

“We are not making the submission that the accused did not arm himself,” Roux told the court in his closing arguments on Friday.

“He armed himself. He went to the toilet. He foresaw that it might be necessary to fire the shots. He was anxious and fearful,” said Roux.

The court simply had to decide whether the action to shoot at the door was simply reflex or whether it was reflex combined with the cognitive.

If the shooting simply happened due to reflex action, then this would prove that Pistorius lacked capacity.

If it was reflex and cognitive combined, then the court should explore what the thought behind the action was, said Roux, adding that the thought in Pistorius’s mind that day was that he was in danger.

Submitting his closing arguments on Thursday, prosecutor Gerrie Nel said Pistorius had shot at the door knowing Steenkamp was behind it.

He called Pistorius an appalling witness who had tailored his evidence.

On Friday, Roux said the evidence of ballistic expert Captain Chris Mangena showed Pistorius was not directly in front of the toilet door when he shot at it, but rather at the bathroom door.

“This proves that he was actually scared and not trusting of the person who was in that toilet,” said Roux.

He was about two metres away from the door when he fired, fatally wounding Steenkamp.

Referring to the Whatsapp messages between Steenkamp and Pistorius, Roux dismissed Nel’s suggestion that the 10 percent “unhappy” messages between the two were the messages that carried the most weight.

Steenkamp had sent a message to Pistorius on January 27, 2013 where she said she was scared of him.

On February 7, 2013, she sent another message explaining that she was unhappy with him.

Roux argued that the subsequent messages were affectionate.

A security guard who testified in the trial told the court that when he called Pistorius shortly after the shooting at his residence, Pistorius told him that “everything was OK”.

On Thursday, Nel criticised Pistorius for this, saying a reasonable action would have been for Pistorius to ask security to call for help.

Roux defended Pistorius on Friday and said there were reasons for this.

Pistorius could have already received help from one of his neighbours who was a doctor, the paramedics had already been called, and he could not speak to the guard because he was crying.

Case shouldn’t have been murder: Roux – Sapa

Paralympic athlete Oscar Pistorius should have been charged with culpable homicide and not murder, his lawyer argued in the High Court in Pretoria on Friday.

Barry Roux SC, said the State’s version that the athlete made up the fact that he mistook his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp for an intruder when he shot her dead was not true.

Roux said Pistorius told the first people who arrived on the scene that he thought she was an intruder.

“He repeated that and went into the bail application before seeing the docket,” Roux said.

“So on what basis are you saying that he is lying?”

Roux said Pistorius was negligent.

“That is culpable homicide… That is what the case should have been about…”

Pistorius is charged with murdering Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges.

On Friday, Roux said the failure by the State to “leave out” evidence left question marks and could mean that the scene was disturbed.

He said State witnesses admitted that they had tampered with evidence. He showed the court two pictures. In one a hand could be seen holding open the bedroom curtain.

“Why was it necessary to keep it open? Why not take a photograph without someone holding the curtain open to gain a real view?” Roux asked.

He also dealt with a moved multiplug and showed a photograph taken in the bedroom.

“The unfortunate consequence of that was that Mr Pistorius was cross-examined that there was no place for the multiplug,” Roux said.

He argued that they had received a photograph from the State on Wednesday that showed a hand either removing or plugging in a plug.

“Was he putting it in or taking it out? What concerns us is that that photo was in the possession of the State.

“The State must have known about this.”

Roux said there was no way the State could argue that the scene was not tampered with.

On Thursday, prosecutor Gerrie Nel completed his closing arguments and described Pistorius as a deceitful and dishonest person, who would rather hide behind untruths than admit he murdered his girlfriend in cold blood.

Nel said Pistorius was an appalling witness who had tailored his evidence to avoid prosecution. He dismissed several points of Pistorius’s testimony as improbable and untruthful.

The case continues.

Pistorius lawyer says ‘cold facts’ do not prove murder – AFP

Oscar Pistorius’s defence lawyer said Friday the ‘cold facts’ did not prove the star sprinter had intended to kill his model girlfriend, as he launched a final bid to save the “Blade Runner” from life in prison.

In his closing argument, fiery defence lawyer Barry Roux sought to pick apart the prosecution’s case that his famous client had deliberately murdered 29-year-old Reeva Steenkamp after an argument in the early hours of Valentine’s Day 2013.

Roux accused the state of ignoring evidence from Pistorius’s upmarket Pretoria home that did not support its “circumstantial” case, a day after the prosecution painted the athlete as a liar.

“The failure of the state to present that evidence leaves one big question mark,” said Roux, “that’s the failure of the state’s case.”

He argued that evidence suggested Pistorius should never have faced murder charges, but rather the trial should have begun with a lesser charge of culpable homicide.

On Thursday Pistorius, a Paralympian known as the “Blade Runner” for his prosthetic legs, was branded a “deceitful” witness by prosecutor Gerrie Nel in his final arguments.

Pistorius’s efforts to concoct an alibi had led to a “snowball effect” of lies requiring more lies to back them up, Nel said.

The athlete says he killed Steenkamp by firing four shots through a locked toilet door after mistaking her for an intruder in his upmarket Pretoria home on the night of Valentine’s Day last year.

The prosecution argues that he deliberately killed her after an argument.

“In an attempt to tailor his version to support his plea explanation, he tangled himself in a web,” said Nel.

Summing up the state’s meticulous 200-page review of evidence gleaned from almost 40 witnesses, Nel said Pistorius, 27, was guilty of “a baker’s dozen” of misleading statements.

Nel addressed the court for most of the day on Thursday before the defence had a brief opportunity to outline the counter-arguments it will present on Friday.

Roux has indicated that he will focus on the timeline of events the night of the shooting, from disputed sounds of gunshots and equally disputed sounds of screams heard by neighbours.

Pistorius, a double-amputee who rose to international fame when he competed alongside able-bodied runners at the 2012 London Olympics, has at times sat weeping and vomiting in the dock as grisly details of Steenkamp’s death were presented.

Once a poster boy for disabled sport, he has been stripped of lucrative endorsement deals by global brands and has withdrawn from all competition.

He faces 25 years in jail if he is convicted of premeditated murder. He also faces three separate gun-related charges.

Even if he is not found guilty of premeditated murder, Pistorius could still be convicted and jailed on alternative charges of culpable homicide.

Tweet: @OscarsTrial #OscarPistorius Roux – you can’t have the law report Jacaranda FM, desperate last resort for state’s case

Tweet: @OscarsTrial #OscarPistorius Nel quoting Leonard Carr interview from Radio Jacaranda is naughty and wrong says Roux

Tweet: @OscarsTrial #OscarPistorius Roux says you can’t, as he claims Nel has done in argument, take a bunch of “could bes” and turn them into a fact

Tweet: @OscarsTrial #OscarPistorius Barry puts it on record that he has a lot of respect for Gerrie but…

Oscar acknowledges Steenkamps in court – Sapa

Murder-accused Oscar Pistorius on Friday made an effort to acknowledge the family of his deceased girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.

Pistorius arrived at the High Court in Pretoria and on his way to his defence team passed by the bench where Steenkamp’s parents June and Barry were seated with other relatives.

He mumbled a “good morning” which was met with silence.

A short while later, his uncle Arnold’s wife Lois headed to the Steenkamp family.

She gave Barry an embrace and he smiled back warmly.

This was the first time Barry was seen publicly interacting with the Pistorius family.

He made his debut in court on Thursday after missing previous proceedings due to ill-health.

Pistorius is charged with murdering Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and it was premeditated.

Pistorius is also charged with three contraventions of the Firearms Control Act, one of illegal possession of ammunition and two of discharging a firearm in public. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges.

Also making a second appearance in court on Friday was Pistorius’s father, Henke.

Besides a handshake, the father and son hardly interacted on Thursday.

On Friday, however, Henke walked up to the dock shortly before proceedings started and gave his son a warm hug, patting him on the back and later holding his hand.

Meanwhile, support for Pistorius continued on the last lap of the trial. Stuck on the back of a bus stop bench outside the court on Friday was a bundle of green and yellow balloons.

“Oscar Pistorius, you will always be our hero,” was written on a poster next to them.

It was unclear who had placed the balloons and poster there.

When proceedings resume at 9.30am, Pistorius’s lawyer, Barry Roux SC, is expected to continue submitting his closing arguments in the case.

He will be explaining to the court why his client should be kept out of jail.

Prosecutor Gerrie Nel wrapped up his closing arguments on Thursday.

He said Pistorius was an appalling witness who had tailored his evidence and told the court a series of untrue versions.

The case continues.

More support for Oscar – Sapa

Support for murder-accused Paralympian Oscar Pistorius continued on the last lap of his trial on Friday.

Stuck on the back of a bus stop bench outside the High Court in Pretoria was a bundle of green and yellow balloons.

“Oscar Pistorius, you will always be our hero,” was written on a poster next to them.

It was unclear who had placed the balloons and poster there.

Meanwhile, a strong media contingent bearing cameras again waited at the court entrance for Pistorius’s arrival.

He is charged with the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day last year.

He shot her through the locked door of his toilet at his Pretoria home.

Pistorius has denied guilt, saying he thought she was an intruder about to open the door and attack him. The State contends he shot her during an argument and that it was premeditated.

Inside the courtroom, Steenkamp’s parents sat in the front awaiting the start of the proceedings.

Her mother June was engaged in conversation with Jacqui Mofokeng, the spokeswoman of the African National Congress Women’s League, who has continuously attended the trial in support of the Steenkamp family.

Her father Barry sat next to another man and read the day’s papers.

Pistorius’s sister Aimee walked into court with another woman shortly before 9am.

The two looked over at the Steenkamp family and said “good morning” before taking their seats on the opposite side of the bench.

Pistorius’s lawyer Barry Roux is expected to continue submitting his closing arguments when proceedings resume at 9.30am.

He will be explaining to the court why his client should be kept out of jail.

Prosecutor Gerrie Nel wrapped up his closing arguments on Thursday.

He called Pistorius an appalling witness who had tailored his evidence and told the court a series of untrue versions.

The case continues.

Pistorius’ defence team to wrap up arguments on Friday – Reuters

Oscar Pistorius’ defence team will wrap up their closing arguments in the murder trial of the South African Olympic and Paralympic athlete on Friday, after which the judge will retire to consider her verdict.

Double amputee Pistorius, 27, once a national icon for reaching the pinnacle of sport, is accused of murdering his law graduate and model girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp at his home in Pretoria on Valentine’s Day last year.

Since the trial opened in early March, state prosecutor Gerrie Nel has portrayed Pistorius as a gun-obsessed hothead who deliberately shot 29-year-old Steenkamp four times through a locked toilet door where she was taking refuge after a heated argument.

The defence says Pistorius, nicknamed the ‘blade runner’ after his hi-tech prosthetics, was a vulnerable and caring boyfriend who killed Steenkamp by accident after mistaking her for an intruder hiding behind the door.

Nel on Thursday said Pistorius had told “a snowball of lies” and called on Judge Thokozile Masipa to convict the track star of intentional murder, a crime which could land him with a life sentence. A potential lesser charge of culpable homicide could carry a sentence of 15 years.

Lead defence attorney Barry Roux began his closing statement by accusing the state of deliberately avoiding calling witnesses whose evidence would have damaged their case.

He will conclude his final arguments on Friday, after which judge Masipa, who has more than 4,000 pages of evidence to review, will retire to consider her verdict.

There is no jury, and so the verdict hinges on whether Masipa, only the second black woman to be appointed a high court judge, believes Pistorius’ version of events.

Steenkamp’s dramatic death has shattered the image of Pistorius as an embodiment of triumph over adversity for both his Paralympic victories and his success against able-bodied athletes at the 2012 London Olympics.

Menzi Kulati.

#BringBackOurGirls

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