F1 hero Michael Schumacher can lead ‘relatively normal life’ soon, says former Ferrari boss | 07 October 2014 | By Don Mackay, Allan Hall

Schumacher's home in Gland, Switzerland, where he is being cared for

Schumacher’s home in Gland, Switzerland, where he is being cared for

The prognosis comes from former Ferrari boss Jean Todt, who visited the stricken star at his Swiss mansion

Stricken F1 hero Michael Schumacher can expect to lead “a relatively normal life” within a short period of time according to former Ferrari boss Jean Todt.

The news comes as a welcome boost for the sport as it reels from the blow of Jules Bianchi’s serious head injury , which he sustained at the Japanese Grand Prix last Sunday.

Todt made his comments on Schumacher after he visited the German star at his Swiss mansion where he is being cared for in a purpose-built medical suite.

“We must assume that Schumacher can lead a relatively normal life again within a short period of time,” said Todt.

“We can say he can probably never drive a Formula 1 car again. But he is fighting.

“His condition improved, and what is just as important is the fact that he is now at home with his family.”

Todt’s news is a boost to 45-year-old Schumi’s fans worldwide who have heard nothing of his condition since he was moved to his Swiss home.

The seven-times world champion Schumacher returned home to his wife and children two months ago after being discharged from a Lausanne rehabilitation clinic.

He was treated there after coming out of his medically-induced coma following a ski accident in the French Alps on December 29 last year , which left him with catastrophic brain injuries.

Todt, now now president of the International Automobile Federation, added: “ In the past weeks and months, he has made progress in relation to the severity of his injury.

“But a long and hard road is in front of him. Hopefully things will improve. His family is close to him. He needs time and peace.”

Schumacher is being cared for by a team of 15 experts at his home.  It is understood he remains immobile and unable to speak.

The team at Gland, where a purpose-built mini-clinic has been constructed inside the Schumacher mansion, consists of 15 people, most of them provided by the Lausanne clinic. 

Schumacher’s father Rolf is moving from his home in Germany at the end of the year to live in a house built in the grounds of the £35 million pound Gland mansion to be near his son and wife Corinna.

Michael’s children Mick, 15, and Gina-Maria, 17, are said to spend hours every day at his bedside.

The news comes as fellow F1 driver Jules Bianchi remains in hospital following a serious crash at the Japanese Grand Prix at Suzuka.

Daily Mirror

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